New smaller 100W Renogy panel

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ELongest
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New smaller 100W Renogy panel
Gordon2
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RE: New smaller 100W Renogy panel

Well this is very interesting and something to keep an eye on. Looking at three different 100 watt panels from Renogy:

  1. RNG-100D (100 Watt Monocrystalline)
  2. RNG-100P (100 Watt Polycrystalline)
  3. RNG-100MB (100 Watt Premium Monocrystalline)

SIZE:

RNG-100D:   47.0” x 21.3” (1,001 square inches)

RNG-100P:    39.7” x 26.7” (1060 square Inches)

RNG-100MB: 40.9” x 20.8”  (848 square inches)

WEIGHT:

RNG-100D: 16.5 lbs

RNG-100P: 16.5 lbs

RNG-100MB: 18.1 lbs

PRICE:  (Best Internet price I found)

RNG-100D: $125 US

RNG-100P: $125 (was $120 when I bought it)

RNG-100MB: $220

So you really pay a premium for their “premium” panel, at least for now.

Note that the standard Poly panel is closer to square with maximum length less than the standard mono panel and might fit better on the roof of a Scamp.  However the premium panel is just a little longer in length than the shorter standard poly panel and narrower than either the standard mono or poly panel.  In fact, it is so narrow that two might possibly fit on a Scamp 16 with roof AC without too much of a problem with shading from the AC.

The Maximum Power Temperature Coefficient for the premium panel is -0.38%/°C whereas for the standard panels it is -.44 and -.47 so the premium panel might perform noticeably better in hotter environments.

The premium panel operates at a slightly higher amperage, and slightly lower voltage, so if all other factors are equal, such as wire gauge, then you might get a little less power from the premium panel.  The amount of loss however is likely trivial and perhaps not even measurable (esp. with short runs) and more than offset by the better temperature coefficient figures.

ELongest
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100W Panel mounting location

I was interested in the panel due to the size for mounting options. I went out and measured my roof today. 40" in front of the A/C comes to where the roof starts to drop down in the front. It could be mounted long ways up front on top. I was thinking of making a fairing from the panel and taper it to the front of the trailer to keep air from getting under it. I think you may also be able mount one side to the awning back and the other side to the edge of the trolley top and line several up above the awning. Tomorrow I will cut out a piece of cardboard and see how it looks.

Eddie

Gordon2
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RE: 100W Panel mounting location

Well Eddie, you are right on my heels with this.  I did the cardboard thing a few weeks ago.

I bought the "more square" poly panel with the thought that it fit better on the roof.  Shading from the AC would be a real problem with the longer panel mounted with the length perpendicular to the length of the Scamp (front to back), but the premium panel might well fit even better than the shorter poly panel.  Let us know what you think when you check it with your cardboard template.

I bought the Windy Nation adjustable mount to use for temporary ground placement of the panel that I bought, making it portable, and hoping that it would also work on the Scamp's roof (either in fixed position or while still being adjustable).  I too thought that a flaring might be a good idea, with the panel rising along with the roof's center section.  But I wont get that far until late summer at the earliest since I am going to experiment with the 100 watt panel in portable configuration first.

PS.. While I agree its good to prevent air from getting under the panel in such a way that it stresses the roof, don't forget that when stationary you still need some air space / air flow under the panel to maximize its output.

ELongest
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I bought the Renogy 100W

I bought the Renogy 100W suitcase last winter for my Scamp. I used it all last summer on my sailboat about one day every two weeks or anytime  I took the boat out. I only ran a radio and Nav equipment but had no way to charge the battery. The panel worked out great. I brought my Scamp to Fl. this winter but it has mostly sat due to house projects. About every two weeks I open up the suitcase and top off the Scamp battery. Easier than running several ext. cords to the trailer. I think a roof mounted panel needs to be the primary panel. When I get back to Va. this spring I'm looking at installing 2- 6V batt. up front and a roof mounted panel .

Eddie 

 

 

phxkayaker
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Solar Mount Option

I was chatting with Greg in Quartzsite about solar and he mentioned the conversations ongoing on SOI. Thought you might be interested in the mount I'm using with an Renogy mono panel. I've been using the installation for over a year now and LOVE it. More than adequate!  The story begins with the January 13, 2015 blog post, continues with the January 16, 2015 blog post, and is summed up with the January 27, 2015 blog post.

Hope the info will help someone.

John & BJ Schroeder
Mesa, AZ
justfinding.blogspot.com

Gordon2
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RE: Solar Mount Option

Thanks for the links - I think I read this before but I studied it more carefully this time.

Many of your construction details are similar to what I have been considering, so maybe I am on the right track. I can't trust VHB tape alone after doing my research, esp. after Escape stop using adhesive (epoxy or VHB) alone as a mounting method.  Perhaps the VHB mounts that failed were faulty installs or even the wrong variety of VHB used. So perhaps it would be fine if done properly, but the thought of a 17 pound projectile at 70 MPH on the highway is a concern.

I have been thinking that maybe mounting a rail permanently on the roof with 5200, and then attaching the panel mounting hardware to the permanent rail with bolts.  I still have a concern with the top layer of gelcoat becoming the failure point using any type of adhesive mounting instead of mechanical mounting. Thoughts?

I expect I will pass ont he tilt option. It adds some complexity to the project that i would like to avoid, and it would be a bit of a pain to tilt without a ladder / step-stool, or a pain to carry the ladder /stool.  Plus, I will have a portable panel as a supplement / backup.

Also I have plenty of composite wood decking material so if I need to use nutplates I might use that instead of maple... its pretty much weatherproof and needs no painting, sealing or other treatment to last a very long time.

Greg A
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Solar Mounts

One item to clear up on your post Gordon, is that Escape didn't use vhb tape on their installation, they used epoxy which must be mixed and applied properly. Failure rate on the Escape install has been very minimal, they just decided to be proactive on making sure it wasn't a continuing problem.

AM solar uses a VHB tape in their install and state they've never had a failure.

All that said I'd feel better just personally with a bolt thru or rivet with backing in addition to the vhb tape.

Ladder isn't really an issue for tilt racks, some can be tilted by just stepping on the bumper, or backing up a truck and standing in the bed. A lot of folks carry the fold up ladders GP Logistics SLDS6 Ladder that go in a fence post tube and mount under the trailer like a sewer tube. Ability to tilt a roof mount panel would be a huge capability especially in shoulder seasons/winter.

Our Trailers:
2015 19 Escape

Buying or Selling Molded FG Trailers:

Fiberglass-RV-4Sale

Gordon2
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Solar Mounts

Thanks for the clarification.. I made an edit in my post to be more clear that the main point is concern over the gelcoat failing as described at this Escape owners forum posting.  A few more posts from that thread that I think are worth noting:

http://www.escapeforum.org/forums/f38/our-solar-panel-blew-off-5742-6.ht...

http://www.escapeforum.org/forums/f38/our-solar-panel-blew-off-5742-8.ht...

http://www.escapeforum.org/forums/f38/our-solar-panel-blew-off-5742-8.ht...

and especially:

http://www.escapeforum.org/forums/f38/our-solar-panel-blew-off-5742-10.h...

 

Greg A
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Exactly

One must keep in perspective that there are thousands of Escape Epoxy installs with an very minimal failure rate, think it was mentioned somewhere in the 2-6 range, but they went proactive on it anyway, retrofitted bolt kits and started manufacturing with bolt through going forward. Interestingly, I was only going to order solar pre-wire on my new trailer, but when this all occurred and they went back to bolt thru I added solar to the new Escape. I feel more confident as stated above if there is bolt or rivet support as well.

On the other coin AMSolar has done thousands of VHB solar installs with a zero failure rate, so there is some evidence that the VHB can be a good approach if done properly. I wouldn't touch the Epoxy because it's way too dependent on a perfect install. 

Our Trailers:
2015 19 Escape

Buying or Selling Molded FG Trailers:

Fiberglass-RV-4Sale

phxkayaker
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Epoxy Thoughts

With a lot of epoxy experience, I'd not be concerned with epoxy IF it was being used to attach something with known good adhesion. I've never inspected the failed Escape mounts, but based on the the materials used and on the one picture I saw, I'm willing to bet the separation was between the aluminum mount they use and the epoxy, not between the epoxy and the gelcoat, nor a failure of the epoxy itself. Aluminum is known to have a poor adhesion to epoxy. On the other hand, VHB is extensively used with aluminum. 

John & BJ Schroeder
Mesa, AZ
justfinding.blogspot.com

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